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Hispanic meeting in Harlingen stalls, but lays groundwork for LULAC

August
14
1927

On this day in 1927, a group of Mexican Americans and Mexicans met at the city auditorium in Harlingen, Texas, to discuss organizing against racial discrimination. The so-called Harlingen Convention was called by El Comit├ę Provisional Organizador Pro-Raza, headed by Alonso S. Perales. Members of various existing groups--including the Order of Sons of America and the Order of Knights of America--attended. Though most came from South Texas, Fort Worth and Houston societies also sent delegates. Conference speakers included Eduardo Idar, Clemente Idar, and J. T. Canales. The convention was divided, however, over the question of whether Mexican citizens should be involved in a Texas political organization. So serious was the disagreement that perhaps 90 percent of the delegates bolted from the meeting. Moreover, some remaining conferees opposed forming a new organization. Nevertheless, a new group came into being. Perales provisionally called it the League of Latin American Citizens. In 1929 its chapters morphed into the League of United Latin American Citizens.

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