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COMECRUDO INDIANS

COMECRUDO INDIANS. The Comecrudo (Spanish for "raw meat eaters") Indians were a Coahuiltecan people who in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries lived in northern Tamaulipas. In the second half of the eighteenth century part of the Comecrudos lived along the south bank of the Rio Grande near Reynosa, and it may be inferred that they hunted and gathered wild plant foods on both sides of the river. At times the Comecrudo Indians were also referred to as Carrizo, a Spanish name applied to many Coahuiltecan groups along the Rio Grande below Laredo. In 1886 the ethnologist A. S. Gatschet found a few elderly Comecrudo near Reynosa who could still speak their native language. Gatschet's Comecrudo vocabulary and texts helped to establish the linguistic affiliations of many Indian groups of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959). Gabriel Saldivar, Los Indios de Tamaulipas (Mexico City: Pan American Institute of Geography and History, 1943). J. R. Swanton, Linguistic Material from the Tribes of Southern Texas and Northeastern Mexico (Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1940).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "COMECRUDO INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmc75), accessed July 22, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.