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ESCANJAQUE INDIANS

ESCANJAQUE INDIANS. The Escanjaque (Ercansaque, Escansaque, Escanxaque, Esquansaque, Excanjaque) Indians are known only from the seventeenth century, and their area remains in doubt. Some writers have interpreted the evidence as indicating that the Escanjaques lived in north central Texas; others have placed them in western Oklahoma. Early attempts to identify the Escanjaques with the Kansa Indians were not successful because it was found that the Kansa Indians lived elsewhere in the seventeenth century. It has been suggested that the Escanjaques were Apaches, but today most writers are inclined to identify them as a Wichita group, possibly the same as the Yscanis of the eighteenth century.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Bancroft, History of the North Mexican States and Texas (2 vols., San Francisco: History Company, 1886, 1889). Herbert E. Bolton, "The Jumano Indians in Texas, 1650–1771," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 15 (July 1911). George P. Hammond and Agapito Rey, eds., Don Juan de Oñate: Colonizer of New Mexico, 1595–1628 (Santa Fe: Patalacio, 1927; rpt., Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1953). George E. Hyde, The Pawnee Indians (Denver: University of Denver Press, 1951; enlarged ed., Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1974). Albert H. Schroeder, "A Re-Analysis of the Routes of Coronado and Oñate into the Plains in 1541 and 1601," Plains Anthropologist 7 (February 1962). S. L. Tyler and H. D. Taylor, "The Report of Fray Alonso de Posadas in Relation to Quivira and Teguayo," New Mexico Historical Review 33 (October 1958).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "ESCANJAQUE INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bme07), accessed December 21, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.