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KABAYE INDIANS

KABAYE INDIANS. The Kabaye (Cabaie) Indians are known only from records of the La Salle expedition, which indicate that these Indians lived inland well to the north or northeast of Matagorda Bay, probably near the Brazos River. The Kabayes have been confused with the Kiabahas, which these records clearly identify as a separate and distinct group who lived in the same area. The Kabayes have not been successfully identified with any specific Indian group in the same area known to the Spanish. However, the similarity in names suggests that the Kabayes of the French may have been the Cava (Caba) Indians of the Spanish.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Isaac Joslin Cox, ed., The Journeys of René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle (2 vols., New York: Barnes, 1905; 2d ed., New York: Allerton, 1922). Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959). Henri Joutel, Joutel's Journal of La Salle's Last Voyage (London: Lintot, 1714; rpt., New York: Franklin, 1968).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "KABAYE INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmk01), accessed November 22, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.