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NATCHITOCH INDIANS

NATCHITOCH INDIANS. The name Natchitoch (Natchitoches, Nachitoch, Nachitos, Nacitos, Naketosh, Natsytos) is primarily linked with a group of Caddo Indians who lived on the Red River in northwestern Louisiana, but in the late seventeenth century one Natchitoch village was found among the Kadohadacho Caddo Indians of extreme northeastern Texas. This village was on the south bank of the Red River in the area of present Bowie County. In the nineteenth century some of the surviving Natchitoch Indians of Louisiana joined remnants of two Caddoan groups of Texas, the Kadohadachos and Hasinais, and eventually reached the Brazos Indian Reservation in the area of present Young County. In 1858 these various Caddoan groups were moved to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. Their descendants now live in the vicinity of Caddo County, Oklahoma.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959). John R. Swanton, The Indian Tribes of North America (Gross Pointe, Michigan: Scholarly Press, 1968). John R. Swanton, Source Material on the History and Ethnology of the Caddo Indians (Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 132, Washington: GPO, 1942). Dorman H. Winfrey and James M. Day, eds., Texas Indian Papers (4 vols., Austin: Texas State Library, 1959–61; rpt., 5 vols., Austin: Pemberton Press, 1966).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "NATCHITOCH INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmn18), accessed October 21, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.