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PESCADO INDIANS

PESCADO INDIANS. The name Pescado (Spanish for "fish") was applied to certain Indians of Trans-Pecos Texas and the adjoining part of northern Chihuahua. In 1683 the Gente de Pescado ("people of the fish") were known to the Jumano Indians, but their location was never identified. These were probably the Pescados of the eighteenth century who originally lived on the north bank of the Rio Grande, near the site of present Redford, but later crossed to the south bank to live at San Antonio de los Puliques, apparently because of Apache pressure. These Pescado Indians were absorbed by the Spanish-speaking population of northern Chihuahua in the late eighteenth century. The Pescado settlement in the area of present Redford was known as Tapalcolmes, which may link the Pescado Indians with the Topacolmes, a late seventeenth-century group, apparently Concho Indians, who lived north of the Rio Grande in the same general area. J. R. Swanton seems to have erred in identifying the Pescados as Coahuiltecans.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Charles W. Hackett, ed., Pichardo's Treatise on the Limits of Louisiana and Texas (4 vols., Austin: University of Texas Press, 1931–46). Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959). J. Charles Kelley, "The Historic Indian Pueblos of La Junta de Los Rios," New Mexico Historical Review 27, 28 (October 1952, January 1953). Carl Sauer, The Distribution of Aboriginal Tribes and Languages in Northwestern Mexico (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1934). J. R. Swanton, Linguistic Material from the Tribes of Southern Texas and Northeastern Mexico (Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1940).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "PESCADO INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmp61), accessed September 17, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.