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PRIETO INDIANS

PRIETO INDIANS. These Coahuiltecan Indians are known through a single report (1794) from Nuestra Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zúñiga Mission near Goliad. In this report they are identified as a subdivision of the Aranama Indians, and it is said that at that time only twelve remained. The name, which is Spanish for "dark ones," suggests that they may have had a darker skin color than other Aranamas, but it may also refer to some distinctive style of body painting.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Esteban L. Portillo, Apuntes para la historia antigua de Coahuila y Texas (Saltillo: Tipografía "El Golfo de México" de Severo Fernández, 1886). J. R. Swanton, Linguistic Material from the Tribes of Southern Texas and Northeastern Mexico (Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1940).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "PRIETO INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmp84), accessed September 01, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.