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TOBOSO INDIANS

TOBOSO INDIANS. In the seventeenth century the Toboso Indians occupied the Bolsón de Mapimí of Coahuila and Chihuahua, and in the following century they frequently raided Spanish settlements to the east in Nuevo León. It is likely that they sometimes crossed the Rio Grande, but records of Tobosos in Texas are rare. However, a few Toboso Indians found their way to Nuestra Señora del Refugio Mission near the Texas coast. Baptismal records indicate their presence at this mission between 1807 and 1828. The Tobosos are frequently identified as Athapaskans (Apaches), but more recent research has produced enough evidence to indicate that the Toboso language was probably Uto-Aztecan.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Jack D. Forbes, "Unknown Athapaskans: The Identification of the Jano, Jocome, Jumano, Manso, Suma, and Other Indian Tribes of the Southwest," Ethnohistory 6 (Spring 1959). Joseph Antonio Fernández de Jáuregui Urrutia, Description of Nuevo León, Mexico (1735–1740), ed. Malcolm D. McLean and Eugenio del Hoyo (Monterrey: Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores, 1964). Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (2 vols., Washington: GPO, 1907, 1910; rpt., New York: Pageant, 1959). Cyrus Thomas and John R. Swanton, Indian Languages of Mexico and Central America and Their Geographical Distribution (Washington: GPO, 1911).

Thomas N. Campbell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas N. Campbell, "TOBOSO INDIANS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/bmt62), accessed September 17, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.