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FARM AND RANCH

FARM AND RANCH. Farm and Ranch, an agricultural journal, was first published by Franklin Pierce Holland in Austin in 1883. The paper, originally known as Texas Farm and Ranch, failed to profit in its early years of operation, and in 1885 Holland moved the magazine to Dallas at the encouragement of local businessmen, convinced that agriculture would eventually surpass livestock raising in the region. The journal's circulation increased, and in 1899 its title was shortened to Farm and Ranch. It was issued in Upper South, Lower South, and Southwestern editions and appeared either weekly or monthly. John H. Connell became editor in 1902, when the paper moved to a new building. Holland promoted agriculture and improvements in the quality of farmers' lives, including experimental farms in Ellis County and near Corpus Christi. He also sponsored farmers' institutes in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma, which were the forerunners of the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, and agricultural clubs for Texas farm children before the founding of 4-H Clubs. Holland organized the Texas Swine Growers Association in 1891 and the Texas Corn Growers Association in 1906, lobbied in support of legislation in the farmers' interest, and championed the cause of education for farmers. In 1949 Farm and Ranch absorbed the Southern Agriculturist and continued its volume numbering as Farm and Ranch with Southern Agriculturist. Its last issue was published in November 1963.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Tom Mann, "A Record of Forty Years of Progress," Farm and Ranch, February 5, 1921. National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Vol. 33.

Diana J. Kleiner

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Diana J. Kleiner, "FARM AND RANCH," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eefap), accessed September 17, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.