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PARIS AND GREAT NORTHERN RAILROAD

PARIS AND GREAT NORTHERN RAILROAD. The Paris and Great Northern Railroad Company was chartered on July 28, 1881, by O. C. O'Connor, J. N. Adams, and S. E. Clements, all of Lamar County. The company was incorporated for the purpose of constructing and operating a railroad from Paris to a connection with the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company (Frisco) at the Red River. The initial capital was $30,000, and the principal office was Paris. Members of the first board of directors were George W. Campbell, Lemuel H. Williams, Adams, O'Connor, Clements, S. J. Wright, U. M. Hale, J. C. Gibbons, and Willet Babcock, all of Lamar County. Construction of the Paris and Great Northern began in February 1886, and the line was placed in service in January 1888. The Frisco acted as contractor and operated the Paris and Great Northern until September 1, 1902. The Paris and Great Northern was the Frisco's initial entry into Texas and served as the gateway for traffic moving between Texas and points on the Frisco system. However, with the extension of Frisco lines into Dallas and Fort Worth after 1900, the importance of the Paris and Great Northern declined. In 1891 the Paris and Great Northern reported passenger earnings of $15,000 and freight earnings of $49,000. Freight traffic reached a peak in 1914 and passenger traffic in 1920. Equipment was provided by the Frisco. On June 1, 1928, the company was merged into the St. Louis, San Francisco and Texas Railway Company. The former Paris and Great Northern line was operated by the Kiamichi Railroad in the 1990s.

Michael M. Ludeman

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Michael M. Ludeman, "PARIS AND GREAT NORTHERN RAILROAD," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eqp05), accessed September 14, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.