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ANDRADE, JUAN JOSE

ANDRADE, JUAN JOSÉ (?–?). Juan José Andrade, commander of a cavalry brigade under Antonio López de Santa Anna during the Texas Revolution, was left in charge of Bexar after the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836. On April 1, he was ordered to prepare to leave for San Luis Potosí, since Santa Anna thought the Texan forces were routed. Andrade and his command were still in Bexar, however, on May 24, 1836, when Vicente Filisola ordered him to demolish the fortifications of the Alamo and march down the left bank of the San Antonio River to Goliad. Filisola met Andrade at Goliad, and the combined force continued to retreat. When the troops were nearing Matamoros on June 8, José de Urrea, who, unknown to Filisola, had replaced him as commander of the Mexican forces, sent orders for Andrade to return to Goliad. The retreat was continued, however, and on June 12 Filisola was notified that Urrea had replaced him. Since Urrea was not with the force, Filisola resigned his command to Andrade. Although the order for Andrade to return to Goliad was repeated on June 12, Andrade thought that the safety of the troops depended on their reaching Matamoros. He therefore defied his orders and took his command into Matamoros on June 18, 1836, thus ending the campaign.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Hubert Howe Bancroft, History of the North Mexican States and Texas (2 vols., San Francisco: History Company, 1886, 1889). Antonio López de Santa Anna et al., The Mexican Side of the Texan Revolution, trans. Carlos E. Castañeda (Dallas: Turner, 1928; 2d ed., Austin: Graphic Ideas, 1970). Dudley Goodall Wooten, ed., A Comprehensive History of Texas (2 vols., Dallas: Scarff, 1898; rpt., Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1986).

Winifred W. Vigness

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Winifred W. Vigness, "ANDRADE, JUAN JOSE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fan16), accessed November 23, 2014. Uploaded on June 9, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.