Bookmark and Share
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

BOREN, SAMUEL HAMPSON

BOREN, SAMUEL HAMPSON (1811–1881). Samuel Hampson Boren, soldier and businessman, son of Capt. James and Jane (Blair) Boren, was born in Giles County, Tennessee, on December 3, 1811. The family moved to Marshall County, Tennessee, where Boren was educated and later taught school. In 1838 he moved to Nacogdoches in the Republic of Texas, where he acquired land and became a prosperous planter. He served under Gen. Thomas J. Rusk in the militia of the republic. In 1846, upon the annexation of Texas to the United States and the outbreak of war with Mexico, he joined the Second Texas Cavalry regiment, part of the brigade commanded by Gen. James Pinckney Henderson. During the war he fought in the battles of Monterrey and Buena Vista and was promoted to lieutenant. In 1854 Boren moved with his family to Tyler, where he began a cotton and general-merchandise business and became a business leader and large landowner. He was active in the early development of Tyler and an incorporator and stockholder in numerous enterprises of great aid to East Texas. He helped buy the lot for the First Christian Church in 1859 and later served on the building committee. He was married at Nacogdoches on October 21, 1839, to Sarah Dickson Long. Eight children were born to them. Boren died on September 28, 1881, and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Tyler.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Sid S. Johnson, Some Biographies of Old Settlers (1900; facsimile, Tyler, Texas: Smith County Historical Society, 1965). William S. Speer and John H. Brown, eds., Encyclopedia of the New West (Marshall, Texas: United States Biographical Publishing, 1881; rpt., Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1978).

Hampson Gary

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Hampson Gary, "BOREN, SAMUEL HAMPSON," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbo29), accessed July 30, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.