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BRAMLETTE, EDGAR ELLIOTT

BRAMLETTE, EDGAR ELLIOTT (1860–1929). Edgar Elliott Bramlette, teacher, foreign minister, and school administrator, the son of William and Adelia (Bates) Bramlette, was born in Paris, Texas, on November 19, 1860. He took his B.A. degree at Vanderbilt University in 1883 and from 1883 to 1886 was instructor in classical languages at the University of Texas, where he received the first M.A. degree awarded by the school (1886). In 1884 he married Louise Linn in Austin. Bramlette was United States consul in Germany from 1886 to 1889. There he helped break up a system of undervaluation by which some importers had gained a monopoly on goods. He also wrote an informative report on trichinosis with regard to an American pork embargo. His import investigation led to his appointment as special expert of the United States Treasury Department. From 1889 to 1891 he studied at Leipzig University. He was superintendent of schools at Fort Worth, Texas, from 1893 to 1898, taught languages at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A&M University) from 1898 to 1900, was president of John Tarleton College (now Tarleton State University) from 1900 to 1906, and taught at Texarkana and Huntsville from 1906 to 1911, when he became superintendent of the Texas School for the Blind in Austin. From 1923 to 1929 he was superintendent of the American Publishing House for the Blind at Louisville, Kentucky. He was a member of Kappa Alpha, the Knights of Pythias, and the Masons. He was a Methodist and a Democrat. Bramlette died in Louisville on March 6, 1929, and was buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Austin.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Austin Statesman, March 9, 1929. Lewis E. Daniell, Texas–The Country and Its Men (Austin?, 1924?). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"BRAMLETTE, EDGAR ELLIOTT," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbr19), accessed August 01, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.