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BREEDING, BENJAMIN WILKENS

BREEDING, BENJAMIN WILKENS (1820–1902). Benjamin Wilkens Breeding, the son of David W. and Sarah (Davis) Breeding, was born in Christian County, Kentucky, in 1820 and moved with his family to Colorado County, Texas, in February 1833. According to his pension application, in 1836 he served in Moseley Baker's company, which fought a detachment of Antonio López de Santa Anna's troops at the San Felipe ferry. Breeding and Thomas Chaudoin later brought the "Twin Sistersqv" cannons, which had bogged down near Harrisburg, to Sam Houston's army at Bernardo Plantation. Because he was on leave to transport his parents beyond the Trinity River, Breeding missed the battle of San Jacinto. But he later fought in battles against the Mexicans and Indians. He obtained a first-class headright certificate in 1838 for a third of a league of land in Fayette County, but his claim was disallowed until April 1847. He served as a private under Col. John H. Moore in an 1840 campaign against the Comanches and was honorably discharged. In 1842 he participated in the campaigns against Rafael Vásquez and Adrián Woll,qqv and in 1843 he was a member of the Snively expedition. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in June 1861 and served as a captain with the Texas state troops during the Civil War. In December 1874 he moved to San Marcos. Breeding married Catherine Jane Mayhar in Colorado County on February 2, 1852, and they had seven children. He was a charter member of the Fayette Masonic Lodge and in 1875 joined the San Marcos lodge. He died in San Marcos in 1902 and is buried there.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Cari Thomas

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Cari Thomas, "BREEDING, BENJAMIN WILKENS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbr27), accessed October 21, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.