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BRYAN, BEAUREGARD

BRYAN, BEAUREGARD (1862–1918). Beauregard Bryan, lawyer, was born in Brazoria County, Texas, on January 16, 1862, the son of Moses Austin and Cora (Lewis) Bryan and the great-grandson of Moses Austin. He attended Baylor University and studied law at the University of Texas. In 1883 he moved to Wichita Falls, where he published the Herald for a year before returning to Washington County. He practiced law in Brenham from January 1885 until he moved to El Paso in 1902. Bryan married Lillian A. Lyles at Mobile, Alabama, on December 23, 1886, and they had three children. He was active in Democrat partyqv politics. He was elected district attorney in Brenham and served in that position for eight years. Subsequently he was a district judge. Governor James Stephen Hogg appointed him a regent of the University of Texas, and he remained on the board for twelve years, under governors Sayers, Culberson, and Lanham. During the Hogg administration Bryan sat on the state executive committee. He participated in the organization of the Texas State Historical Association and held various offices in that organization. He was for four years a member of the El Paso school board and a member of the Knights of Pythias. He was an Episcopalian. Bryan died at El Paso on March 4, 1918. A collection of his papers is housed at the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

"Archives Collection," Library Chronicle of the University of Texas, Summer 1944. Frank W. Johnson, A History of Texas and Texans (5 vols., ed. E. C. Barker and E. W. Winkler [Chicago and New York: American Historical Society, 1914; rpt. 1916]). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

James L. Hailey

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

James L. Hailey, "BRYAN, BEAUREGARD," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbrak), accessed July 25, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.