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BRUNI, ANTONIO MATEO

BRUNI, ANTONIO MATEO (1856–1931). Antonio M. Bruni, entrepreneur and rancher, the son of Mateo and Dominica (Bogales) Bruni, was born on September 19, 1856, in Bozzi, Emilia-Romagna, Italy. His parents died when he was a young boy. In 1872 he moved to San Antonio to live with his uncle Antonio Bruni. Five years later he moved to Laredo and opened a mercantile store with his brother Luigi. The two also had a store in Nuevo Laredo. His mercantile business took him into Webb and Zapata counties, where he acquired an interest in the sheep and cattle industries. In 1882 Bruni was appointed tax assessor of Webb County and in 1892 was elected a county commissioner. He was appointed county treasurer four years later and held this position until his death. Among other business activities, he was vice president of the First National Bank of Laredo, director of the Texas-Mexican Railway, and director of the Border Gas Company. He owned land in Webb and Zapata counties. He established a town on one of his ranches and named it Bruni. Bruni married Consolación Henry in 1879, and the couple had nine children. Consolación was a descendant of José de Urrutia. They were devout Catholics, prominent local philanthropists, and staunch supporters of the Democratic party. Bruni died on August 18, 1931. When he died, his ranch holdings came to over 200,000 acres. Bruni Park in Laredo is named for him.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Ellis A. Davis and Edwin H. Grobe, comps., The New Encyclopedia of Texas, 4-vol. ed. The Italian Texans (San Antonio: University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures, 1973). Laredo Times, August 18, 19, 1931. A Twentieth Century History of Southwest Texas (2 vols., Chicago: Lewis, 1907).

Valentine J. Belfiglio

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Valentine J. Belfiglio, "BRUNI, ANTONIO MATEO," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbrbf), accessed August 20, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.