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DAVIS, DANIEL

DAVIS, DANIEL (?–1838). Daniel Davis, early settler, son of John Davis, was born and grew to manhood on the Duck River in Tennessee. He married Matilda Tidwell and moved to Missouri, where she died. Davis subsequently married Nancy McKelvey, probably of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, on January 20, 1818. Later that year they moved to Pecan Point in what is now Red River County, Texas. The family was farming and raising livestock in the Liberty, Texas, area in 1826. At Pecan Point in 1832 Sam Houston visited in the Davis home en route to Texas. Davis, a trapper and bear and buffalo hunter, hunted as far as the Wichita Mountains and the upper Red River. Late in 1832, after the death of his second wife, he again moved along Trammel's Trace to Shelby County and settled on the Tenaha River. He took part in the battle of Nacogdoches in July 1832 and by April 1836 was one of William Becknell's mounted volunteers. Apparently he and several others moved north just before the battle of San Jacinto. While living in East Texas Davis married his third wife, Mrs. Margaret Bascus. He moved back to the Red River country after the revolution and lived ten miles from Clarksville until late 1837, when he moved to his headright in the vicinity of Honey Grove in what is now Fannin County. Davis was killed by Indians in 1838.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

R. L. Jones, "Folk Life in Early Texas: The Autobiography of Andrew Davis," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 43 (October 1939, January 1940). Macum Phelan, History of Early Methodism in Texas, 1817–1866 (Nashville: Cokesbury, 1924); A History of the Expansion of Methodism in Texas, 1867–1902 (Dallas: Mathis, Van Nort, 1937).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"DAVIS, DANIEL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fda35), accessed August 29, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.