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DEBRAY, XAVIER BLANCHARD

Title:Xavier Blanchard Debray (photo)  Source: Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library Xavier Blanchard Debray (1819–1895)
Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs,
DeGolyer Library, Central University Libraries,
Southern Methodist University

DEBRAY, XAVIER BLANCHARD (1818–1895). Xavier Blanchard Debray, soldier, was born in Selestat (Schlettstadt), near Epinal, France, on January 25, 1818, the son of Nicholas Blanchard, a government official, and his wife Catherine Benezech. He is often said to have attended the French Military Academy at St. Cyr and then served in the French diplomatic service until he immigrated to the United States via New York on September 25, 1848. St. Cyr, however, has no record of his attending. He moved to Texas in 1852, settled in San Antonio, and was naturalized there on April 5, 1855. That same year he established a Spanish newspaper with A. A. Lewis called El BejareƱo. Later he worked in the General Land Office as a translator. He also established an academy that prospered until the Civil War began. In 1859 Debray ran a strong but losing race for mayor of Austin.

After brief service with Company B, Fourth Texas Infantry, Debray served as aide-de-camp to Governor Edward Clark during the summer of 1861. In September, 1961, he commissioned major of the Second Texas Infantry. On December 7, 1861 he was elected lieutenant colonel and commander of Debray's Texas Cavalry battalion and on March 17, 1862, colonel of the Twenty-sixth Texas Cavalry. From January to June of 1862 he commanded on Galveston Island. In July he assumed command of the military subdistrict of Houston in the Department of Texas. He commanded some of the Confederate troops in the recapture of Galveston on January 1, 1863. On February 13, 1863, he was relieved of command of the eastern subdivision of Texas in the Trans-Mississippi Department, and on May 30 he took command of the troops on Galveston Island in the District of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. British observer Arthur Fremantle found Debray “a broad shouldered Frenchman, and a very good fellow,” who’d left France because of political differences with Emperor Napoleon. Although he was assigned temporary command of the eastern subdistrict of Texas in June 1863, by July 1 he had resumed his position on Galveston Island. Debray led his regiment in the Red River campaign in Louisiana during the spring of 1864. For his participation in the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, he was appointed brigadier general by General Edmund Kirby Smith on April 13, 1864, but this was never confirmed by President Jefferson Davis. Nevertheless, he commanded a brigade consisting of the Twenty-third, Twenty-sixth, and Thirty-second Texas Cavalry regiments. Debray discharged his men on March 24, 1865.

After the war he moved to Houston and then to Galveston, working as a teacher and a bookkeeper before eventually returning to his position as translator in the General Land Office. He died in Austin on January 6, 1895, and was buried in the State Cemetery.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Bruce S. Allardice, More Generals in Gray (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995). Xavier Blanchard Debray, A Sketch of the History of Debray's (26th) Regiment of Texas Cavalry (Austin: Von Boeckmann, 1884; rpt., Waco: Waco Village, 1961). The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Marcus J. Wright, comp., and Harold B. Simpson, ed., Texas in the War, 1861–1865 (Hillsboro, Texas: Hill Junior College Press, 1965).

Anne J. Bailey and Bruce Allardice

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Anne J. Bailey and Bruce Allardice, "DEBRAY, XAVIER BLANCHARD," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fde02), accessed September 18, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Modified on January 18, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.