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DORR, JOHN M.

DORR, JOHN M. (?–?). John M. Dorr (Dor, Door), pioneer settler and Nacogdoches county official, moved to Red River County, Texas, in 1830 and served for a time as secretary to Benjamin Rush Milam. In 1834 he proceeded to Nacogdoches, where he became secretary of the ayuntamiento on January 1, 1835. He married Eliza Frisby in Nacogdoches on August 25. On January 1, 1836, he was elected a judge of the municipality and on August 30 issued a call for the organization of a local militia. Sam Houston's appointment of Dorr, on November 8, 1836, as one of three commissioners to treat with the Indians was not confirmed by the Senate. On November 16, however, Dorr became primary judge of Nacogdoches. In 1837 he bought land there and purchased an interest in Travis, a landing on the Angelina River. On September 25, 1839, he made a deposition in Galveston concerning Vicente Córdova. Dorr died sometime between 1839 and 1845.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Carolyn Reeves Ericson, Nacogdoches, Gateway to Texas: A Biographical Directory (2 vols., Fort Worth: Arrow-Curtis Printing, 1974, 1987). Charles Adams Gulick, Jr., Harriet Smither, et al., eds., The Papers of Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (6 vols., Austin: Texas State Library, 1920–27; rpt., Austin: Pemberton Press, 1968). Milam-McKinney Papers, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin. Nacogdoches Committee of Vigilance and Safety Records, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin. Amelia W. Williams and Eugene C. Barker, eds., The Writings of Sam Houston, 1813–1863 (8 vols., Austin: University of Texas Press, 1938–43; rpt., Austin and New York: Pemberton Press, 1970).

L. W. Kemp

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

L. W. Kemp, "DORR, JOHN M.," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fdo19), accessed July 25, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.