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DREYFUSS, SOL

DREYFUSS, SOL (1885–1951). Sol Dreyfuss, merchant, was born on August 12, 1885, in Dallas, the son of Gerard and Julia (Hurst) Dreyfuss. His father, a native of France, owned several chains of stores before Sol's birth, including one with his wife's father founded in 1879 and called Hurst and Dreyfuss. Sol attended Bryan Street High School and Sachs Preparatory High School in New York. In the 1880s Hurst and Dreyfuss merged with E. M. Kahn and Company. In 1905 Dreyfuss began working at his father's clothing store and continued for several years until he joined Sanger Brothers (see SANGER, ALEXANDER). On August 11, 1910, the doors opened to the first Dreyfuss and Son clothing store, a one-story building on Main Street. By 1950, at the time of Dreyfuss's death, the store was a six-story building at Main and Ervay streets.

Dreyfuss owned the Dallas Baseball Club from 1928 to 1938, when the team was known as the Steers. He was a director of Hope Cottage. He was active in the Community Chest and Red Cross and was a member of the Salesmanship Club, the Citizens Charter Association, the Lakewood Country Club, the Columbian Club, and B'nai B'rith. He was also on the board of directors of both the Republic National Bank and the Pollock Paper Company. After the death of their parents, he and his sister, Hortense Pollock, turned their family home over to the Campfire Girls and the Visiting Nurses Association for its central offices. Dreyfuss was Jewish, but he called himself an unofficial member of all churches. His wife was Episcopalian; his daughter was raised Episcopalian and married a Methodist. Dreyfuss died on May 27, 1951, in Dallas and was buried at Emanu-El Cemetery.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Dallas Morning News, May 28, 1951.

Lisa C. Maxwell

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Lisa C. Maxwell, "DREYFUSS, SOL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fdr03), accessed July 29, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

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