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FIELD, SCOTT

FIELD, SCOTT (1847–1931). Scott Field, politician, was born in Canton, Mississippi, on January 26, 1847, the son of Henry and Jane (Bates) Field. During the Civil War he enlisted in Harvey's Scouts, and his unit was attached to Jackson's command under Gen. Nathan B. Forrest. In the Georgia campaign, he saw action with Joseph E. Johnston, and he also fought in the Tennessee theater under John B. Hood. After the war Field attended the University of Virginia, from which he graduated in 1868. He returned to Mississippi, taught school for two years while he studied law, and was admitted to the Mississippi bar in 1871. He moved in 1872 to Calvert, Texas, where he established a private practice. Field served two terms as county attorney in Robertson County between 1878 and 1882 and was elected to the Texas Senate for two terms, 1887 through 1891. While in the Senate he was credited with the act that forbade convict leasing (see CONVICT LEASE SYSTEM). He was a delegate to the Democratic national convention at Chicago in 1892. He represented the Sixth Congressional District as a Democrat from 1903 to 1906. His law practice prospered, and he became a substantial landholder. Field was married three times. His first wife, Victoria Luckey of Mississippi, died after two years of marriage. He then wed Lucy Randolph of Calvert. They had three sons. After Lucy's death Field married a widow, Maude Green, of Calvert. He died in Robertson County on December 20, 1931.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Biographical Directory of the American Congress. Richard Denny Parker, Historical Recollections of Robertson County, Texas (Salado, Texas: Anson Jones, 1955).

James L. Hailey

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

James L. Hailey, "FIELD, SCOTT," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ffi03), accessed December 21, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.