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FITZGERALD, DAVID

FITZGERALD, DAVID (?–1832). David Fitzgerald, Old Three Hundred settler, came to Texas as a widower aged over fifty, probably from Georgia, late in 1821. With his son John and two slaves, he paddled a canoe up the Brazos River in search of Stephen F. Austin's colony in January 1822 and settled on the east bank of the river three miles below the site of present Richmond. On October 20, 1823, Austin wrote Luciano García that he had been compelled to cause five men and their families, including David Fitzgerald, to leave the colony because they were fugitives from justice in the United States. Apparently Austin reconsidered because Fitzgerald, as one of the Old Three Hundred settlers, received title to a league of land now in Fort Bend County on July 10, 1824, and raised crops there in 1825 and 1826. He died in 1832, and his plantation became the property of his daughter, Sarah, who had married Eli Fenn in Georgia before the Fitzgerald and Fenn families moved to Texas.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Eugene C. Barker, ed., The Austin Papers (3 vols., Washington: GPO, 1924–28). Lester G. Bugbee, "The Old Three Hundred: A List of Settlers in Austin's First Colony," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 1 (October 1897). Clarence Wharton, Wharton's History of Fort Bend County (San Antonio: Naylor, 1939).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"FITZGERALD, DAVID," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ffi26), accessed September 19, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.