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FLORES, MANUEL [1801-1868]

FLORES, MANUEL (ca. 1801–1868). Manuel Flores, participant in the Texas Revolution, was born in San Antonio around 1801 (possibly as early as 1799), the son of José Antonio Flores de Abrego and María Antonia Rodríguez. He was a widower for the second time before he married María Josefa Courbiere in 1835. In the fall of 1835 he became a member of the volunteer company organized by his brother-in-law, Juan N. Seguín. This company was composed of San Antonio-area Mexicans who were sympathetic to the Texas colonists' stand against Antonio López de Santa Anna, president of Mexico. Flores participated in the expulsion of Gen. Martín Perfecto de Cos at the siege of Bexar in December 1835. The company disbanded but was reorganized in Gonzales during the first week of March 1836, and Flores became Captain Seguin's first sergeant. He fought in this capacity at the battle of San Jacinto.

In 1838 Flores and his wife established a ranch on the south side of the Guadalupe River across from Seguin, Texas. In the spring of 1842 he again took up arms in defense of Texas; he was a member of the party that pursued the army of Rafael Vásquez after the brief invasion of San Antonio by the Mexicans. In 1853 he sold his ranch and established a new one in Atascosa County. His wife died the next year, and about 1858 he married Margarita Garza. He was a Mason in Alamo Lodge No. 44. Flores died on December 3, 1868. He has often been confused with the Mexican emissary Manuel Floresqv, who was killed at the battle of the San Gabriels.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Antonio Menchaca, Memoirs (San Antonio: Yanaguana Society, 1937). Thomas L. Miller, Bounty and Donation Land Grants of Texas, 1835–1888 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1967). Juan N. Seguin, Personal Memoirs (San Antonio, 1858).

Roderick B. Patten

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Roderick B. Patten, "FLORES, MANUEL [1801-1868]," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ffl17), accessed October 20, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.
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