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GONZALEZ, JOSE

GONZÁLEZ, JOSÉ (?–1773). José González was a military officer stationed in Texas during the governorship of Juan María Vicencio de Ripperdáqv (1770–78). In July 1770 Lieutenant González, from his command at the Los Adaes presidio, passed intelligence to Ripperdá that Taovaya Indians and their allies intended to attack San Antonio and drive all Spaniards from that settlement. The governor responded by strengthening the defenses of Bexar. He ordered the complete abandonment of El Orcoquisac, reassigning its personnel to San Antonio; and he likewise instructed González to transfer all but ten men from Los Adaes. The latter contingent arrived at San Antonio in February 1771. Following issuance of the New Regulations for Presidios (1772), commandant inspector Hugo Oconór ordered Ripperdá to dismantle the garrison at Los Adaes and to arrange for the transfer of all settlers from East Texas to San Antonio. The governor issued his instructions in Los Adaes and then returned to San Antonio, leaving enforcement of the order in the hands of the aged Lieutenant González, who had been a resident of Los Adaes for thirty-seven years. From the former capital, González led the forced evacuation as far as Nacogdoches, where he fell ill and died, on July 30, 1773. The caravan, however, continued on to Bexar and reached the new capital on September 26. Ironically, González, a veteran of many campaigns against the Indians, had been scheduled for retirement upon his arrival at San Antonio.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Herbert Eugene Bolton, "The Spanish Abandonment and Re-occupation of East Texas, 1773–1779," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 9 (October 1905). Carlos E. Castañeda, Our Catholic Heritage in Texas (7 vols., Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1936–58; rpt., New York: Arno, 1976).

Donald E. Chipman

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Donald E. Chipman, "GONZALEZ, JOSE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fgo66), accessed August 29, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.