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GUYOT, JEAN MARIE

GUYOT, JEAN MARIE (ca. 1848–1907). Father Jean Marie Guyot, Catholic missionary, was born between 1845 and 1848, possibly in Chandon, France. He was ordained a priest by Bishop Claude M. Dubuis on December 17, 1870, in St. Mary's Cathedral, Galveston. His early assignments included Liberty, Gainesville, and Denison, as well as both the Ursuline Convent and St. Mary's Cathedral in Galveston. In 1881–82 he served as vice president of St. Mary's University in Galveston. When he arrived in Fort Worth in 1884, the city had only fifteen Catholic families. The congregation grew steadily under Guyot, who directed the construction of St. Patrick's Church (now St. Patrick Cathedralqv). The building, dedicated on July 10, 1892, featured eighteen granite columns and the first stained-glass windows in North Texas, imported from Germany. Father Guyot was also instrumental in securing the services of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word of San Antonio, who founded St. Joseph's Hospitalqv, and the Sisters of St. Mary of Namur, who established St. Ignatius Academy. Personal sacrifice characterized Father Guyot's ministry. He lived simply, declining a salary. In 1905 he fell gravely ill and was taken to Chicago for surgery. He continued in failing health until his death at St. Joseph's Hospital on August 3, 1907. He is buried in St. Patrick Cathedral.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Catholic Archives of Texas, Files, Austin. William R. Hoover, St. Patrick's: The First 100 Years (Fort Worth: St. Patrick Cathedral, 1988). James F. Vanderholt, Biographies of French Diocesan Priests in Nineteenth Century Texas (1978).

Steven P. Ryan, S.J.

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Steven P. Ryan, S.J., "GUYOT, JEAN MARIE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fgu22), accessed September 01, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.