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HOLT, BENJAMIN

HOLT, BENJAMIN (1795–1867). Benjamin Holt, pioneer and delegate to the Convention of 1832, the son of David and Rebecca (Belk) Holt, was born on April 1, 1795, in the Natchez District of Mississippi. He owned a small plantation in Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana, and served in the militia during the War of 1812. He moved to Mexican Texas in 1825 with his wife, Charity Ann (Wrinkle), and settled in the Sabine District. At the Convention of 1832 he voted to divide Coahuila and Texas. He also was appointed to a special committee responsible for reporting on land business between the San Jacinto and Sabine rivers. In 1835 Holt was a character-certification commissioner for immigrants. In this capacity he was required to verify their moral worth so that they could acquire land. He served on a committee appointed to found a seat of justice for the Sabine District in December 1835. Holt sold his land in Sabine County in January 1837 and lived in Louisiana with his wife and nine children until the early 1850s. He returned to settle on Ranch Prairie in Brazoria County, Texas, in 1852 and died there on January 16, 1867.

Two other Benjamin Holts were also living in Texas in the mid-1800s. Benjamin Franklin Holt, the fourth child of Benjamin and Charity Holt, became a farmer in Brazoria County. A third Benjamin Holt, born in North Carolina in 1796, moved to Texas in the late 1840s and served as county treasurer of Angelina County in 1850.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Hans Peter Nielsen Gammel, comp., Laws of Texas, 1822–1897 (10 vols., Austin: Gammel, 1898). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832–1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941).

William Harry Holt

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

William Harry Holt, "HOLT, BENJAMIN," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhobb), accessed July 10, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.