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HUTCHESON, JOSEPH CHAPPELL

HUTCHESON, JOSEPH CHAPPELL (1842–1924). Joseph Chappell Hutcheson, legislator and Confederate soldier, was born near Boydton, Virginia, on May 18, 1842, the son of Charles Sterling and Mary Hutcheson. In 1861 he graduated from Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, and immediately enlisted in Company C of the Twenty-first Virginia Infantry; he served under Gen. Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley campaign of 1862. By the time of Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Hutcheson was in command of Company E of the Fourteenth Virginia Infantry. Subsequently he entered the law school of the University of Virginia, and he graduated in 1866. He then moved to Texas and established a practice in Anderson. In 1874 he moved to Houston, where he was elected to the Seventeenth Texas Legislature in 1880. There he drafted the bill that established the University of Texas. He also served, in 1890, as chairman of the State Democratic Convention. Hutcheson was elected to the House of Representatives of the Fifty-third and Fifty-fourth congresses but declined to run for a third term. He married Mildred Carrington in 1867, and they had eight children. Mildred died in 1882. In 1886 Hutcheson married Betty Palmer Milby, and they had two sons, both of whom became Houston attorneys. Hutcheson died at his summer home near Chattanooga, Tennessee, on May 25, 1924, and was buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Houston.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Biographical Directory of the American Congress (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1859-). Houston Post, May 27, 1924. Houston Press Club, Men of Affairs of Houston and Environs (Houston: Coyle, 1913). Sidney S. Johnson, Texans Who Wore the Gray (Tyler, Texas, 1907).

Thomas W. Cutrer

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Thomas W. Cutrer, "HUTCHESON, JOSEPH CHAPPELL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhu48), accessed August 28, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.