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JOHN, ISAAC GRIFFIN

JOHN, ISAAC GRIFFIN (1827–1897). Isaac G. John, Methodist minister and editor, was born on January 14, 1827, in Brookville, Indiana, the son of Enoch D. and Nancy (Stewart) John. The family moved to Galveston about 1840, though John may have not actually moved until the mid-1840s. He attended Rutersville College and entered the Methodist ministry in 1847. He served numerous circuits in western and central Texas. John was editor of the Texas Christian Advocate (later the United Methodist Reporter) from 1866 to 1884. He served in pastorates and as presiding elder of districts at the same time. He was a member of the Board of Missions from 1874 to 1886, when he was selected by the General Conference as chief executive of the denomination's Board of Missions in Nashville, Tennessee. He also edited Methodist Church missionary literature. John married Ruth A. Eblin on October 12, 1852, in Bastrop County. They had seven children. After his wife's death, he married a Mrs. Vaughn of Gallatin, Tennessee. John received an honorary A.M. from Soule University at Chappell Hill in 1867 and later received a D.D. degree. He was a Mason and a Democrat. He died on March 17, 1897, in Nashville, Tennessee, and was buried in Georgetown.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Annual of the Texas Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 58th Session, 1897. Charles Waldo Hayes, Galveston: History of the Island and the City (2 vols., Austin: Jenkins Garrett, 1974). William S. Speer and John H. Brown, eds., Encyclopedia of the New West (Marshall, Texas: United States Biographical Publishing, 1881; rpt., Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1978).

Walter N. Vernon

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Walter N. Vernon, "JOHN, ISAAC GRIFFIN," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fjobs), accessed September 16, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.