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JUERGENS, CONRAD

JUERGENS, CONRAD (ca. 1796–ca. 1838). Conrad Juergens (Jurgens), an early settler, was a resident of Steinheim, Westphalia, Prussia, and thirty-seven years old at the time of his marriage to Mary Theresa Hennecke (see JUERGENS, MARY THERESA), on July 20, 1833. Juergens, his wife, and two sons lived at Post Oak Point near Industry, Austin County, Texas, by 1834. In 1836 when others were leaving their homes for protection from Indians and Antonio López de Santa Anna's army, the Juergens family did not leave their cabin. Mrs. Juergens and her sons were kidnapped by Indians, while Juergens escaped and joined a group of settlers who had camped near Mill Creek bottom. Mrs. Juergens was later ransomed at a Red River trading post, but the Indians did not release the boys. She gave birth to a daughter, Jane Margaret (who later married H. D. Jordt), while she was with the Indians. Juergens joined the revolutionary army for a while. However, he later left and joined the settlers who were fleeing ahead of Santa Anna's army. He was deceased by March 1, 1838, when Theresa presented a claim for a league and labor of land to the Board of Land Commissioners of Austin County.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Rudolph L. Biesele, The History of the German Settlements in Texas, 1831–1861 (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1930; rpt. 1964). Rosa Kleberg, "Some of My Early Experiences in Texas," trans. Rudolph Kleberg, Jr., Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 1, 2 (April, October 1898). J. H. Kuykendall, "Reminiscences of Early Texans," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 6–7 (January, April, July 1903). Caroline Von Hinueber, "Life of German Pioneers in Early Texas," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 2 (January 1899).

Arliss Treybig

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Arliss Treybig, "JUERGENS, CONRAD," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fju09), accessed April 18, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.