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KELLOGG, ALBERT GALLATIN

KELLOGG, ALBERT GALLATIN (1810–1839). Albert Gallatin Kellogg, Republic of Texas merchant, was born in 1810. He immigrated to Texas in 1834 as a single man and settled in the San Augustine district, where he entered into a merchant partnership with William Coote. In the fall of 1835 various committees were formed in Texas to discuss the impending revolution. At the meeting of the San Augustine Committee of Safety and Correspondence, Kellogg served as secretary. He was one of six delegates seated as representatives of the district when the Consultation convened at San Felipe on November 3. He was assistant quartermaster general of the army in 1836. After resigning, on June 8 he accepted appointment as agent to collect public property for the use of the army. For two years, 1836–38, he sold ammunition, food, and general supplies to the Texas army. In 1837 Kellogg was one of fifteen on the board of trustees selected to form the government of San Augustine University. He was appointed postmaster of San Augustine in 1836 and held the office until John G. Berry was named as his replacement on September 30, 1839. The probate of Kellogg's estate was filed in San Augustine county court on September 17, 1839. Kenneth L. Anderson was the administrator.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

George L. Crocket, Two Centuries in East Texas (Dallas: Southwest, 1932; facsimile reprod., 1962). James M. Day, comp., Post Office Papers of the Republic of Texas (2 vols., Austin: Texas State Library, 1966–67). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832–1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941). Gifford E. White, Character Certificates in the General Land Office of Texas (1985).

McXie Whitton Martin

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

McXie Whitton Martin, "KELLOGG, ALBERT GALLATIN," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fke09), accessed April 23, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.