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KENDRICK, CARROLL

KENDRICK, CARROLL (1815–1891). Carroll Kendrick, camp-meeting revivalist and journalist, son of Jesse and Mary (Parker) Kendrick, was born on December 29, 1815, in Maury County, Tennessee. He lived in Alabama, Kentucky, and Texas before moving to California. His mother was a sister of Daniel Parker, noted predestinarian Baptist minister. Kendrick married Mary Wade Forbus near Stanford, Kentucky, in November 1841. Nine children were born to them. Kendrick was educated at Bacon College, Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and received an honorary M.A. from Franklin College of Nashville, Tennessee. He was a physician as well as a minister and editor in the Christian Church. He moved to Texas in 1851 as a missionary and supported his family by farming, practicing medicine, and preaching. He was probably the leading evangelist of the Christian churches in Texas for about a quarter of a century. He claimed to have witnessed 10,000 conversions between 1851 and 1877. Kendrick was a prominent revivalist and was largely responsible for beginning the practice of holding camp meetings for Christian churches in Texas; he conducted meetings through East Texas and on the Western frontier. He lived at Palestine, Salado, Bryan, and Bastrop.

In 1872 at Bryan he began the Texas State Meeting, an annual cooperative meeting of representatives of many Texas Christian churches, in the interest of evangelism. Regional cooperative meetings had been held as early as 1845 in every section of Texas. Since the churches were autonomous in government, the meetings were for consultation, encouragement, and evangelism and were venues where congregations pledged support for one or more full-time evangelists. After Kendrick moved to California, the efforts of liberal preachers, viewed as "carpet-bag" Northern preachers by Texans, succeeded in organizing the 1886 state meeting at Austin into the Texas Christian Missionary Society, although it was opposed by Kendrick and a strong force. Kendrick returned to Texas from California to lend his support against the society.

He wrote for many Christian periodicals. He was editor of the Ecclesiastic Reformer in Kentucky before he moved to Texas. He became the first Christian Church publisher of a religious periodical in Texas in 1855 when he published the Christian Philanthropist, which merged with the Tennessee Gospel Advocate in September 1856. The Philanthropist was reissued for several months beginning in August 1866 but was again merged with the Advocate, and Kendrick conducted the Texas department. He wrote a volume called Live Religious Issues of the Day: Rules and Principles for Bible Study (1890). Part of this work was reprinted as Rules for Bible Study in 1946. He died in 1891 at Downy City, California.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Claudine M. Dollar, The Gardner Family-Allied Families: Kendrick, Parker, Forgy and Gage (Blair, Oklahoma: Pioneer, 1983). Lawrence W. Scott, ed., Texas Pulpit by Christian Preachers (St. Louis: Christian, 1888).

R. L. Roberts

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

R. L. Roberts, "KENDRICK, CARROLL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fke68), accessed October 31, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

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