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LESLIE, ANDREW JACK

LESLIE, ANDREW JACK (1815–1885). Andrew Jack Leslie, Perote prisoner, was born in 1815 in Tennessee. On September 11, 1842, he was captured with Capt. Chauncey Johnson's San Antonio Company by Mexican general Adrián Woll, who had invaded Texas. The prisoners were marched to Mexico and incarcerated in Perote Prison, near Veracruz. Leslie was in the group of thirty who were released in March 1844. In the 1850 census he listed his occupation as barkeeper and gave the value of his real property as $4,000. Texas awarded him a tract of land near Helotes, on which he lived until his death. Affectionately known by relatives and friends as "Uncle Jack," he remained unmarried. On November 10, 1881, he recorded a will making his nephew, Sam G. Leslie, his sole beneficiary and specifying ground under a spreading oak overlooking Helotes Creek as his final resting place. He died on February 6, 1885, and was buried there.

Another Andrew J. Leslie was also a resident of Bexar County in 1850. In the census of that year he described himself as a forty-year-old native of Tennessee, currently employed as deputy county clerk. His real property was valued at $1,000.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Rena Maverick Green, ed., Samuel Maverick, Texan (San Antonio, 1952). Frances Terry Ingmire and Robert Lee Thompson, Bexar County, Texas, Land Titles (1980). Thomas L. Miller, Bounty and Donation Land Grants of Texas, 1835–1888 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1967). Joseph Milton Nance, Attack and Counterattack: The Texas-Mexican Frontier, 1842 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1964). San Antonio Daily Express, February 7, 1885. James L. Trueheart, The Perote Prisoners; Being the Diary of James L. Trueheart (San Antonio: Naylor, 1934).

S. W. Pease

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

S. W. Pease, "LESLIE, ANDREW JACK," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fle32), accessed October 25, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.