Members Only Area
Bookmark and Share
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

LEVY, ABRAHAM M.

LEVY, ABRAHAM M. (1859–1924). Abraham M. Levy, businessman, the son of M. H. and Adelena J. Levy, who immigrated from Prussia, was born in Houston, Texas, on September 23, 1859. He attended private schools in Houston and worked as a clerk for William Foley before founding his own business in 1887 with his brother Leo. Five years later the brothers moved to larger quarters and in 1897 began construction on yet another store, at a cost of $1,000 a foot. At one time the company employed 400 people and was considered the largest mercantile establishment in the South. Two other brothers later joined the firm, which was noted for its fair employment practices and policy of taking in employees on a cooperative basis. In addition to being president of Levy Brothers Dry Goods Company, Levy was a director of the Union National Bank, Bankers' Trust Company, and Houston Land Corporation and membership chairman of the Houston chapter of the American Red Cross. He was president of United Jewish Charities. After his death funds in his memory were donated to build a new temple for Congregation Beth Israel, Houston. He died on November 10, 1924, in Harris County.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Anne Nathan Cohen, The Centenary History of Congregation Beth Israel of Houston (Houston, 1954). Houston Press Club, Men of Affairs of Houston and Environs (Houston: Coyle, 1913). The Industrial Advantages of Houston, Texas, and Environs (Houston: Akehurst; facsimile rpt., Bryan, Texas: Fuller Printing, 1977). Marie Phelps McAshan, A Houston Legacy: On the Corner of Main and Texas (Houston: Gulf, 1985). Natalie Ornish, Pioneer Jewish Texans (Dallas: Texas Heritage, 1989).

Diana J. Kleiner

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Diana J. Kleiner, "LEVY, ABRAHAM M.," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fle76), accessed December 22, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.