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MUSE, KATE CABELL

MUSE, KATE CABELL (1861–1927). Kate Muse, organizer of the Texas division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the daughter of Harriett (Rector) and William L. Cabell, was born on January 6, 1861, at Fort Cobb, Indian Territory. In 1872 or 1873 the family moved to Dallas, where Cabell opened a law office. After the death of Mrs. Cabell, Kate was the hostess in her father's home, where meetings and reunions of Confederate leaders were frequent. Winnie Davis, daughter of Jefferson Davis, was a friend and regular guest. Having organized a Dallas chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy to minister to the needs of Confederate veterans in Dallas, Kate Cabell sent out a call for charter members for a state organization; the first meeting was held at Victoria on May 25, 1896. She became the first president of the Texas Division and served later as fourth president general of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, as Texas president again in the silver jubilee year (1921), and as honorary president and life member of the state executive board. She was also a member and officer of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Colonial Dames of America, and the Daughters of 1812. She was married twice, the first time in 1889 to J. R. Currie and the second time to J. C. Muse, a Dallas attorney, in 1907. She died in Dallas in July 1927 and was buried there. The Dallas Historical Society, which she sponsored, preserves her letters and clippings.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Elizabeth Brooks, Prominent Women of Texas (Akron, Ohio: Werner, 1896). Dora Davenport Jones, comp., The History of the Julia Jackson Chapter #141, United Daughters of the Confederacy (Fort Worth, 1976).

Claudia Hazlewood

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Claudia Hazlewood, "MUSE, KATE CABELL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fmu18), accessed November 26, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Modified on March 3, 2011. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.