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NEU, CHARLES TERNAY

NEU, CHARLES TERNAY (1885–1950). Charles Ternay Neu, son of Jacob and Magdalena (Weihing) Neu, was born in Brenham, Texas, on February 18, 1885. He attended public schools and, after graduating from Brenham High School, taught for a short time at West, Texas. He entered the University of Texas and graduated with a bachelor of arts in history in 1908 and a master of arts in history the following year. While at the university he assisted George P. Garrison in editing the Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas, published in two volumes in 1908 and 1911. Neu became a fellow of the Texas State Historical Association in 1910. After leaving Austin he taught history in public schools in Cisco, Dallas, and Greenville, then joined the history faculty at East Texas State Teachers College, Commerce, in 1917. During his first years in Commerce he taught history and German. By 1925 Neu had risen to the chairmanship of the history department, a position he held for the following thirty-three years. In 1928 he received his Ph.D. in history from the University of California at Berkeley. Neu contributed articles and book reviews to scholarly journals on a regular basis. He wrote an essay, "The Annexation of Texas," published in New Spain and the Anglo-American West: Historical Contributions Presented to Herbert Eugene Bolton (1932), and the entry "The Republic of Texas" for The State Book of Texas (1937). He also established the East Texas Historical Museum and served as curator. Neu married Johnie Marshall of Greenville, Texas, on June 12, 1912, in Greenville. The couple had a son. Neu died at his home in Commerce on May 8, 1950.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Commerce Journal, May 9, 1950.

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"NEU, CHARLES TERNAY," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fne18), accessed September 20, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.