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PIERCE, LOVICK

PIERCE, LOVICK (1903–1987). Lovick Pierce, Methodist publisher, was born in Sparta, Georgia, on October 3, 1903, the son of Walter Flournoy and Sarah (Alfriend) Pierce. He received a bachelor's degree from Georgia Military College in 1921, a doctorate in business administration from Morningside College of Sioux City, Iowa, in 1952, and an honorary doctorate from Ohio Northern University in 1961. He was employed from 1921 to 1929 by the Methodist Publishing House in Richmond, Virginia, and was manager of the Cokesbury Book Store in Dallas, Texas, from 1929 until 1946. During his service in Dallas the store made great progress financially and by 1937 opened a new building in the heart of the city. Publishers Weekly called the new building a Texas milestone. Pierce was active in civic and religious affairs in Dallas and served as treasurer of the South Central Jurisdiction of the Methodist Church for several years while living in Dallas. He was elected in 1946 as head of publishing for the Methodist Church in America, headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. In this capacity he was a member of the Hymnal Commission (1960–1964), of the American Booksellers Council, and of the National Council of Churches. During his leadership of the Methodist Publishing House it became one of the largest such operations in the world. He retired about 1970. Pierce married Eugenia Carter in 1926, and the couple had a son and a daughter. Pierce died in Nashville on April 14, 1987.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Dallas Morning News, August 22, 1970. Walter N. Vernon, The United Methodist Publishing House: A History (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1989). Who's Who in the Methodist Church (Nashville: Abingdon, 1966). Who's Who in America, 1966–67.

Walter N. Vernon

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Walter N. Vernon, "PIERCE, LOVICK," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fpi35), accessed August 30, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.