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SCORE, JOHN NELSON RUSSELL

SCORE, JOHN NELSON RUSSELL (1896–1949). John Nelson Russell Score, Methodist minister, son of John and Katie Marie (Ebrecht) Score, was born in White Church, Missouri, on April 21, 1896. He received the B.A. degree from Scarritt-Morrisville College in Missouri in 1914 and the B.D. degree from Emory University in Georgia in 1916; he attended New College, Edinburgh, Scotland, and the University of Edinburgh in 1919, then received the Th.D. degree from the Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, California, in 1924. He had entered Methodist ministerial and religious work in 1913 and held pastorates and various positions of service and responsibility in the church both in the United States and in Europe. During World War I Score served as chaplain with the rank of first lieutenant in the United States Army from 1918 to 1919. After the war he served as chaplain with the rank of captain in the California National Guard (1925–26) and later in the Texas National Guard. On June 1, 1942, he became president of Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas, a position he held until his death. He was a member of the board of trustees of several Methodist institutions and was active in various scholarly societies as well as civic clubs. He was married to Margaret Ruth Smith on January 12, 1921; they had one son. Score died on September 26, 1949, and was buried in the Lois Perkins Chapel on the campus of Southwestern University in Georgetown.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Ralph W. Jones, Southwestern University, 1840–1961 (Austin: Jenkins, 1973). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Forrest E. Ward

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Forrest E. Ward, "SCORE, JOHN NELSON RUSSELL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fsc22), accessed September 21, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.