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TUMLINSON, JOHN JACKSON, JR.

TUMLINSON, JOHN JACKSON, JR. (1804–1853). John Jackson Tumlinson, Jr., DeWitt colonist, Texas Ranger, and participant in the Texas Revolution, was born in Lincoln County, North Carolina in 1804, the son of John Jackson and Elizabeth (Plemmons) Tumlinsonqv. He traveled to Texas with his parents in 1821. When his father was killed by Indians in 1823, John and his brother Joseph Tumlinson, together with other settlers, tracked and killed the guilty parties. John and his brothers Joseph, Andrew, and Peter Tumlinson spent their lives defending Texans from depredations by Indians and Mexicans. John and Andrew married sisters, Laura and Hariett Cottle; John and Laura had one son. John and Andrew were awarded headrights in DeWitt's colony. Andrew was killed by an Indian before his award was authenticated, and his land was deeded to his widow. After John Tumlinson's wife and son died he resettled in Clinton near his headright on the Guadalupe River, just north of the site of present Cuero. In July 1842 he married Delaney Asher; after her death he married her sister, Mary Ann (Polly), in August 1849. John was one of eight Tumlinson men who participated in the Texas Revolution. In 1835 as first lieutenant in Robert M. Coleman's company he participated in the battle of Gonzales and the siege of Bexar. Under orders of the provisional government to defend settlers from Indian raids he organized another company of rangers who defended what is now known as Tumlinson Blockhouse. Tumlinson served until August 1836, when he resigned. He died in 1853.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Dan E. Kilgore, A Ranger Legacy: 150 Years of Service to Texas (Austin: Madrona, 1973). Samuel H. Tumlinson, Tumlinson, A Genealogy (Eagle Bay, British Columbia, 198?).

Samuel H. Tumlinson

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Samuel H. Tumlinson, "TUMLINSON, JOHN JACKSON, JR.," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ftu30), accessed July 10, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.