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WAKEFIELD, PAUL LOUIS

WAKEFIELD, PAUL LOUIS (1895–1961). Paul Louis Wakefield, journalist, politician, and soldier, son of John Henry and Della (Hogg) Wakefield, was born at Lovelady, Texas, on May 6, 1895. He attended the public schools there and studied at the University of Texas, where he majored in journalism. He served as an enlisted man in the United States Army in France in World War I. As a newspaperman immediately after the war, Wakefield was with the United Press in Paris and New York. He was on the staff of the Houston Chronicle for ten years and was Texas correspondent for the New York Herald-Tribune during the time of Stanley Walker's editorship. He also wrote special correspondence for the old New York World. In 1927 he was appointed first lieutenant in the Texas National Guard. Over the years he rose to the grade of major general, and in 1949 he was appointed state director of selective service; he retired in 1955. Wakefield served as an aide to governors Ross S. Sterling and Coke R. Stevenson. He was appointed to the planning board of the Public Works Administration in 1934, was at one time a member of the staff of Vice President John Nance Garner, and served as an assistant to Jesse Holman Jones. Wakefield was married on January 24, 1928, to Eleanor L. Wilson; they had one son. The marriage ended in divorce, and on December 22, 1946, Wakefield married Miss William Lois LaLonde in San Antonio. Wakefield died in Austin on March 23, 1961, and was buried in Austin Memorial Park.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Austin American, March 24, 1961. Houston Post, March 24, 1961. Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

William Boyd Sinclair

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

William Boyd Sinclair, "WAKEFIELD, PAUL LOUIS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fwa13), accessed August 27, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.