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WARWICK, BRADFUTE

WARWICK, BRADFUTE (1839–1862). Bradfute Warwick, Confederate officer, was born in Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia, on November 24, 1839, the son of Corbin Warwick. Warwick was raised in the elite society of Virginia, and in 1856 he attended the University of Virginia. The following year, he attended the Medical College of New York. In 1858 Warwick traveled to Europe and fought with Garibaldi in the effort to unify Italy. When the Civil War began, Warwick volunteered for service with the Confederacy. He initially served as a captain on the staff of General Henry Wise in western Virginia. On September 30, 1861, Warwick was assigned to the Fourth Texas Infantry Regiment, which had recently arrived in Virginia, and was promoted to the rank of major on October 2, 1861. He earned another promotion to lieutenant colonel on March 3, 1862, Warwick was mortally wounded at the battle of Gaines' Mill on June 27, 1862. Two days later, on June 29, 1862, Warwick was promoted to colonel. However, he died on July 6, 1862, and was buried at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Texas, National Archives and Records Service. Mrs. Burton Harrison, Recollections Grave and Gay (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1911). An Illustrated History of the Fourth Texas Infantry (http://www.pha.jhu.edu/~dag/4thtex/history/history.html), accessed June 12, 2006. James A. Mundie, Jr., with Bruce S. Allardice, Dean E. Letzring, and John H. Luckey, Texas Burial Sites of Civil War Notables: A Biographical and Pictorial Field Guide. (Hillsboro, Texas: Hill College Press, 2002).

Aragorn Storm Miller

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Aragorn Storm Miller, "WARWICK, BRADFUTE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fwaai), accessed November 24, 2014. Uploaded on April 13, 2011. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.