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YOUNG, MARVIN R.

YOUNG, MARVIN R. (1947–1968). Marvin R. Young, Medal of Honor recipient, was born in Alpine, Texas, on May 11, 1947, the son of Roy Clinton and Marilyn (Hoskins) Young. After graduating from Permian Basin High School in 1965 he attended Odessa Junior College and the College of Marin in Kentfield, California. He enlisted in the United States Army at Odessa in September 1966 and was sent to Vietnam the following year. In Vietnam Staff Sergeant Young was wounded twice, in December 1967 and in February the following year. On August 21, 1968, he was leading a squad of Company C, First Battalion (mechanized), Fifth Infantry, Twenty-fifth Infantry Division, on reconnaissance patrol near Ben Cui. The squad was attacked by a large force of the North Vietnamese Army and were pinned down; the platoon leader was killed. Young unhesitatingly assumed command, moving from position to position, encouraging his men, and directing fire on the hostile insurgents. He constantly exposed himself to enemy fire. After receiving orders to withdraw, he remained behind in order to provide covering fire. He was proceeding to assist part of the squad that was unable to withdraw, when he received a critical head injury. Nonetheless, he continued his mission and was wounded twice more, including a badly shattered leg. He refused assistance, remaining behind to cover the withdrawal. Young was killed by the advancing Vietnamese. He is buried in Sunset Memorial Cemetery in Odessa, Texas.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Committee on Veterans' Affairs, United States Senate, Medal of Honor Recipients, 1863–1973 (Washington: GPO, 1973). San Angelo Standard Times, March 12, 1970.

Art Leatherwood

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Art Leatherwood, "YOUNG, MARVIN R.," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fyobz), accessed September 30, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.