Bookmark and Share
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

FAIRFIELD LAKE STATE PARK

FAIRFIELD LAKE STATE PARK. Fairfield Lake State Park is on Farm Road 3285 on the southern and southwestern shores of Fairfield Lake, six miles northeast of Fairfield in northeastern Freestone County. On November 2, 1971, the State of Texas signed an agreement with Dallas Power and Light Company, Texas Power and Light Company, and Texas Electric Service Company to lease and develop land for a park along Fairfield Lake. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department developed three sections, comprising 1,460 acres. The park officially opened on March 1, 1972. The terrain consists of woodland in which various types of oaks, as well as hickories, dogwoods, blackjack, and pecan, predominate. Indian grass, switchgrass, and other native Texas grasses are common there as well as wildflowers. The lake contains a variety of fish including catfish, bass, sunfish, carp, and crappie. Because Fairfield Lake serves as a cooling lake, its warm water also facilitates the stocking of redfish, hybrid stripers, and Florida largemouth bass. Shore and water birds such as herons, egrets, and geese frequent the area. Bald eagles have also wintered in the region. The park has 135 campsites, a number of picnic sites, playgrounds, two boat ramps, a fishing pier, hiking trails, and a swimming area. Swimmers take advantage of the heated water's therapeutic benefits. Chancellor Union Cemetery, a rural graveyard, is located just outside the park entrance.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Laurie E. Jasinski, "Land of Great Promise: A History of Fairfield Lake State Park" (unpublished report, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Cultural Resources Program, Austin, 2002). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Chris Cravens

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Chris Cravens, "FAIRFIELD LAKE STATE PARK," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/gkf05), accessed August 01, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.