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PANHANDLE NATIONAL GRASSLANDS

PANHANDLE NATIONAL GRASSLANDS. In 1958 the United States Forest Service established the Panhandle National Grasslands, with headquarters at Amarillo. The entity comprised some 300,000 acres, mostly in small tracts of land scattered over North Texas, western Oklahoma, and northeastern New Mexico. Tracts in Texas amounted to 117,268 acres in Dallam, Fannin, Gray, Hemphill, Montague, and Wise counties. Most of the grasslands came from the Dust Bowl lands purchased by the federal government in the 1930s and 1940s under the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act. The grasslands were administered under a policy of multiple uses: soil recovery and conservation, range, watershed protection, recreation, and wildlife. A forest supervisor in Amarillo administered the unit, assisted by rangers in Clayton, New Mexico, Cheyenne, Oklahoma, and Texline, Alvord, and Bonham, Texas. The land provided seasonal forage for 15,000 cattle. Areas for picnicking, fishing, and boating were developed in association with some 1,600 acres of lakes. Deer, antelope, Barbary sheep, ducks, geese, turkey, quail, and other small game were available in limited numbers for hunting under state laws. On July 1, 1970, the forest supervisor's office in Amarillo was closed, and headquarters for grassland districts in the southwestern region of the United States were located at Albuquerque, New Mexico.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"PANHANDLE NATIONAL GRASSLANDS," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/gkp04), accessed November 23, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.