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COAHOMA, TX

COAHOMA, TEXAS. Coahoma, on Interstate Highway 20 ten miles northeast of Big Spring in east central Howard County, probably took its name from Coahoma County, Mississippi, which in turn derived its name from an Indian word meaning "red panther." Early names for the community included Signal Mountain and Signal Mountain Station, after a nearby hill. After the 1881 arrival of the Texas and Pacific Railway in the area, Coahoma grew into a retail trade center and shipping point. Its residents built their first school in 1891, and Gertrude McIntyre was the first teacher. By the time its second school was built in 1904, the town had a post office. Machinery and oilfield supplies became the most important goods distributed from Coahoma after the major oil strike of 1926. In 1928 the town had 600 residents, and its school district served 205 pupils. Between 1936 and 1956 the community's population rose from 620 to 802, and the number of commercially rated businesses went from eighteen to twenty-three. In 1960 the population was reported as 1,239, and in 1970 it was 2,000. In 1980 Coahoma had 1,069 residents, of whom 224 were Hispanic and none were black. At that time the community also had twenty-four businesses, a bank, and a post office. In the early 1990s it was an incorporated community with a population of 1,157 and forty-eight rated businesses. In 2000 Coahoma had forty-eight businesses and a population of 932. Texas outlaw Rube Boyce is buried in the Coahoma Cemetery.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Historic Howard County (Big Spring, Texas: Howard County Survey Committee, n.d). Joe Pickle, Gettin' Started: Howard County's First 25 Years (Big Spring, Texas: Heritage Museum, 1980).

Noel Wiggins

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Noel Wiggins, "COAHOMA, TX," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hjc14), accessed September 03, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.