Bookmark and Share
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

ANNETTA, TX

ANNETTA, TEXAS. Annetta is on Farm Road 1187 six miles southeast of Weatherford in southeastern Parker County. Settlement began there in the late 1870s, when a Mr. Fraser established a station for the convenience of freighters who traveled east to Dallas and on to Jefferson. Fraser named his station Annetta after his daughter. In the early 1880s, after the tracks of the Texas and Pacific Railway passed near his station, Fraser built a general store on the rail line, and gradually a community developed at the site. An Annetta post office operated from 1876 until 1907. By the mid-1890s Annetta had a population of twenty-five, three churches, a public school, and a general store; it was a shipping point for cotton and local crops. For most of the twentieth century Annetta served area farmers as a school and church community. The number of residents remained well below fifty until the late 1970s. At that time the community grew suddenly, probably as a result of the dramatic growth of nearby Fort Worth. By the 1980s the northern and southern sections had split off from central Annetta. Annetta North incorporated in the mid-1980s and reported 281 residents. Annetta South also incorporated during the 1980s and claimed a population of 115. In 1990 Annetta had a population of 678; Annetta North had 265, and Annetta South had 413.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

John Clements, Flying the Colors: Texas, a Comprehensive Look at Texas Today, County by County (Dallas: Clements Research, 1984). Gustavus Adolphus Holland, History of Parker County and the Double Log Cabin (Weatherford, Texas: Herald, 1931; rpt. 1937). Kathleen E. and Clifton R. St. Clair, eds., Little Towns of Texas (Jacksonville, Texas: Jayroe Graphic Arts, 1982).

David Minor

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

David Minor, "ANNETTA, TX," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hla19), accessed August 22, 2014. Uploaded on June 9, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.