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LEIGH, TX

LEIGH, TEXAS. Leigh, also known as Antioch, is at the intersection of Farm roads 134 and 1999, fourteen miles northeast of Marshall in northeastern Harrison County. The community is on a site said to have been the location of a large Indian village. In the early 1840s, J. J. Webster built a plantation home, Mimosa Hall, a mile southwest of the site; Webster's descendents occupied the house until 1984, when the property was sold. The community of Antioch, which had a predominantly black population, was founded before 1900 and was centered around the Antioch Baptist Church. In 1900 the forerunner of the Louisiana and Arkansas Railway built through Antioch, and Rev. James Patterson built a restaurant and a general store on land adjoining the railroad. Residents of Blocker, three miles to the northeast, moved to the railroad community. Antioch was renamed Leigh in 1901, after the wife of John W. Furrh, who owned much of the land on the railroad, and that same year the Leigh post office opened. In 1904 Leigh had one school with five white students and four schools with 297 black students. By 1914 the community had a population of fifty, three general stores, two cotton gins, a drugstore, a blacksmith shop, and telephone service. After attaining a peak population of 126 in the 1920s, Leigh declined to 100 in 1930, when it had a church, two schools, and three businesses. The railroad was rerouted to the north in the 1950s. By 1978 Leigh had two churches (St. Paul's Episcopal and Antioch Baptist), a community center, the Antioch Cemetery, and a number of dwellings. From the 1930s to 2000 the community's population was estimated at 100.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Harrison County Historical Herald, May 1966.

Sallie M. Lentz

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Sallie M. Lentz, "LEIGH, TX," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hll33), accessed July 22, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.