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LONG MOTT, TX

LONG MOTT, TEXAS. Long Mott is a community just south of the junction of State Highway 185 and Farm Road 2235 in western Calhoun County. The site was settled by German immigrants in 1853. The first settlements were on the shore of San Antonio Bay in the vicinity of two large motts, called the Upper and Lower motts. The Upper Mott was the larger and longer of the two, and when a post office was established for the community in 1887, it was called Long Mott. Frederick W. Roemer was the first postmaster. Other early settlers of Long Mott included Dr. John and Anna Mary (Braentegam) Roemer. Guy Mission was an early black resident. A school was established in Long Mott as early as 1892, and the first teacher was Harriet (Reeves) Thayer. In 1904 one teacher taught eleven students at the community. By 1914 Long Mott reported a telephone connection, a lumber company, two general stores, and 200 inhabitants; at that time it was served by the St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway. In the early 1930s Long Mott reported seventy-five residents, and by 1939 its schools had six teachers instructing 133 white students, and one teacher instructing eighteen black students. The community population was reported as seventy-five through the 1930s and 1940s and then rose to 100 in 1952. By 1955 the Long Mott school district had been incorporated into the larger county school district, and Long Mott students were bused to Port Lavaca schools. The population peaked in 1968 at 125, and then from 1970 to 2000 was reported as seventy-six.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Calhoun County Historical Commission, Shifting Sands of Calhoun County, Texas (Port Lavaca, Texas, ca. 1980). John B. Hayes, A Survey and Proposed Plan of Reorganization of the Schools of Calhoun County, Texas (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1939).

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

"LONG MOTT, TX," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hnl43), accessed July 28, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.
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