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SPADE, TX (MITCHELL COUNTY)

SPADE, TEXAS (Mitchell County). Spade is at the site where Wildhorse Creek crosses State Highway 163, twelve miles southwest of Colorado City in central Mitchell County. Settlement of the region began in the 1890s, and a small community developed around the rural school of Liberty, established in 1899 near Wildhorse Creek. Early settlers included the families of R. E. Hargrove, J. L. VanZandt, P. W. Crump, and J. D. Falkner. A post office was opened there in 1902 and was named Herbert for Colorado City postmaster Herbert Hazard. In 1909 the office was renamed Spade after the Spade Ranch. The post office served the community until it was moved to Colorado City in 1912. By 1910 Spade had the post office, a general store, a gin, a blacksmith shop, a school, a Baptist church, and a Woodmen of the World Lodge; at that time the community was a stop on the Colorado City-Sterling City stage line. The old Liberty school was renamed Spade in 1910. In 1930, 101 students attended the school and the district encompassed 124 square miles. The Spade school was consolidated with that of Westbrook in 1938. The community was locally known during the early 1900s for its Fourth of July picnics and political rallies, one of which was attended by James V Allredqv. A Methodist church was built about 1930, and by 1947 the town reported one store, two churches, and ten residents. One church and a cemetery remained in 1972. Spade was still shown on county maps in the 1980s.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Lore and Legend: A Compilation of Documents Depicting the History of Colorado City and Mitchell County (Colorado City Record, 1976).

Charles G. Davis

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Charles G. Davis, "SPADE, TX (MITCHELL COUNTY)," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hts18), accessed August 27, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.