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NORTH TEXAS BAPTIST COLLEGE

NORTH TEXAS BAPTIST COLLEGE. North Texas Baptist College, in Jacksboro, the county seat of Jack County, began its first academic session in September 1891. The college was planned by the Jack County Educational Institute, which was organized in Jacksboro in 1883 to develop a school system that would be attractive to prospective Jack County residents. On April 3, 1884, a three-story brick building housing both a grammar school and a high school was completed. In the late 1880s the JCEI advertised in the local Jacksboro paper, the Gazette, and in the pages of the State School Journal for someone to establish a college. In May 1891 the JCEI and the newly organized North Texas Baptist College Convention agreed to establish the North Texas Baptist College at Jacksboro.

The college leased the institute's building and began classes in September. A faculty of six taught 113 students. L. H. Bryant was appointed acting president. In 1892 Thomas B. King replaced Bryant, and enrollment increased to 291. Like many institutions of higher education at that time, the college combined primary, preparatory, and collegiate courses. The school's promising future never materialized, however. Unable to compete with the large number of colleges established in North Texas during the 1890s, North Texas Baptist College, the only college ever established in Jack County, closed in 1897.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Ida Lasater Huckabay, Ninety-Four Years in Jack County (Austin: Steck, 1949; centennial ed., Waco: Texian Press, 1974). William Franklin Ledlow, History of Protestant Education in Texas (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1926).

David Minor

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

David Minor, "NORTH TEXAS BAPTIST COLLEGE," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kbn03), accessed April 24, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.