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ST. STEPHEN'S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

ST. STEPHEN'S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL. St. Stephen's, a private coeducational boarding and day school for grades seven through twelve located near Loop 360 just west of Austin, was established in 1948 as a diocesan institution under the aegis of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Reverend William Brewster was the first headmaster. St. Stephen's is accredited by the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest and is a member of the National Association of Episcopal Schools. In 1990 the physical plant of St. Stephen's included four academic buildings, a library of 18,000 books, five student dormitories, faculty housing, and a dining hall on 400 acres in the Hill Country. Athletic facilities included four fields used for football, baseball, and field hockey; one baseball and one softball field; tennis courts; a six-lane outdoor track; a gymnasium; and a swimming pool. A. Frederick Weissbach joined St. Stephen's as headmaster in 1989, when the faculty consisted of fifty-three instructors. In addition to its core curriculum of English, history, math and science, St. Stephen's offers a four-year curriculum in Latin, courses in art and music history, and theology. Students are offered opportunities to study abroad at St. Andrew's Boys' High School in Japan, in Barcelona, or in summer workshops in Spain and France. The 1989–90 student enrollment was 302. One hundred percent of St. Stephen's graduates attend a four-year college or university.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

St. Stephen's Episcopal School (Austin: St. Stephen's Episcopal School, n.d.). Vertical Files, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.

Amy Heffernan Glenney

Citation

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this article.

Amy Heffernan Glenney, "ST. STEPHEN'S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kbs66), accessed August 20, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.